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Recidivism Study

Kailey and Alisha
Kailey and Alisha

The Dictionary defines a recidivist as a convicted criminal who reoffends repeatedly. When a former inmate has been released back into society after which they reoffend resulting in re-incarceration…it is called “recidivism”. In the United States the national recidivism rate is approximately 70%.

Roger and Son
Roger and Son

Since its beginnings in January of 2002, over 2000 male and female inmates have completed the Theotherapy Project programs at correctional facilities here in Middle Tennessee. A study concluded in May of 2009 indicated a significant drop in the recidivism rate for those inmates graduating from our programs who were released back into the community over the first seven years of the program.   The 2009 study  reflected a combined recidivism average of 15%, which is an overall drop of 4% from the previous study conducted in 2007.


FEMALES:

215 female inmates graduated from the Theotherapy programs and were released over the course of the last seven years.  While many of them attended and completed the program multiple times, each individual inmate was counted only once regardless of the number of times they completed the program.  Twenty-three inmates were disqualified from the study for one of the following reasons:

1. They are now deceased.

2. They shared common names with other inmates in the system whereby actual status could not be verified based on available records.

3. Inmate’s whereabouts are unknown (i.e. moved to another state after expiration of sentence or termination of probation or parole).

Out of 192 eligible female inmates, 20 recidivated (this includes those who recidivated, absconded or had their parole revoked) for a total female recidivism rate of 10.42%, a drop of almost 5% from the last study.

MALES:

169 male inmates graduated from the Theotherapy programs and were released over the course of the last seven years.  While many of them attended and completed the program multiple times, each individual inmate was counted only once regardless of the number of times they completed the program.  Thirty-seven male inmates were disqualified from the study for one of the following reasons:

1. They are now deceased.

2. They shared common names with other inmates in the system whereby actual status could not be verified based on available records.

3. Inmate’s whereabouts are unknown (i.e. moved to another state after expiration of sentence or termination of probation or parole).

Out of 132 eligible male inmates, 26 recidivated (this includes those who recidivated, absconded or had their parole revoked) for a total male recidivism rate of 19.70%, a drop of almost 5% from the last study.